We want your input and feedback on a permanent (ten year life) exhibition that we are planning to open at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in the spring of 2012. This blog reveals concepts and stories that we may include in the exhibition. Tell us what you think of those concepts and stories and let us know how you think we could make this exhibition more interesting.

Tell us what you like, what you don't like, and what you find most interesting.


Listen to Michale Lang (Executive Director, Whyte Museum), discussing
the Gateway to the Rockies exhibition:




The Gateway to the Rockies exhibition will present a brief history of the Canadian Rockies. It is designed to introduce visitors to the art, history and culture of the Canadian Rockies.

Throughout the exhibition, key figures and critical moments in Rocky Mountain history will be used to shape the narrative. These individuals represent men and women from diverse ethnic, cultural, and social backgrounds – from prominent socialites to ordinary people. The individual stories of these alpine adventurers, hunters of peace, and artistic eyes make it possible to highlight the richness of their time; their context enables a fresh reading of this place and its resonant past.

The stories of individuals will bring the story of the Canadian Rocky Mountains alive for our visitors who, through our research, indicate that they want to learn about and experience more personal stories of the Rocky Mountains. The individuals we chose embody the spirit of this place. 

To make your donation to the Gateway to the Rockies exhibition or any of our Giving Programs, please visit http://www.whyte.org/ and click "Get Involved."

September 19, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 19, 1908

Saturday, Sept. 19.
Bow Lake
               5 to 5½ hrs. drive to camp near Lower Bow Lake.  Met J. Simpson.

September 18, 2011

September 17, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 17, 1908

Mosquito Camp.
Thursday, Sept. 17.
               6 hrs. 20 m. drive to the lower end of Wildfowl L.  The Sask. has changed its channels too, since the high water – thought we were going to have to swim the last one.  W. went into it carrying Muggins, but the pup got an unexpected dunking, for he was pitched off pretty quick when Peter lost his footing and began to swim.  U. found a place lower down however, where we crossed only knee deep.  Got a bunch of 6 fool hens.  Weather perfect.

September 16, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 16, 1908

Graveyard Camp.
Wednesday, Sept. 16.
               Weather trying to clear off, but on persistent shower kept right with us for an hour going down the valley.  5 hrs. drive to Mosquito Camp.  Beautiful and warm and sunny when we arrived.  Mts. all covered with fresh snow, autumn foliage and cloud effects very pleasing.  Aneroid 4650.
               W. found the Midget after a long search, took his shoes off and let him go again.  There is a new hoof growing on the injured foot, but W. says he never will be any use, except for bear bait next spring.

September 15, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 15, 1908

Moss Camp.
Tuesday, Sept. 15.
               Heavy rain in the night, continuing more moderately most of the day.  2½ hrs. to Graveyard Camp.  When we got out on the flats after the last bit thro the woods, there, a few hundred yards to the left of the high rock bluff where the trail comes out, stood a teepee large as life and twice as natural with smoke coming out at the top.  We did not see it till we had got way past it down the flat and across the river, and then of course, almost discolated [sic] our necks staring at it, but no other sign of life appeared except the smoke.  There was much conjecturing as to who it might be.  Indians – was the first thought naturally, but then they would hardly dare hunt out of season in one of the main valleys like this, where the game wardens are so much stricter than they seem to be in the Ath country.  Or it might be a Brewster outfit – they sometimes use a teepee.  Altho we were not very keen about either Indians or Brewsters, W. took Blue Peter late in the P. M. to ride up and see who it was, after having found out that there were no fish in the creek.  U. brought us most of the news, however, long before W. came back.  He had been to J. S’s. shack and saw one of the outfit come riding down from the West Branch.  He thought it was an Indian at first as he was wearing a blanket coat, brass studded belt, etc., but soon saw that was impossible, as the individual came quite close before he was aware of U’s. presence at all, and both of them right out on the open flat.  It was only an innocent young tenderfoot sport, who had got into the clutches of Brewster Bros. and been outfitted for all he was worth.  He was out to Fortress Lake last year, with J. Brewster, in connection with the timber deal.  This year he and two others of his kind – somebody Reid “the great baseball player” – are out here loose with no one to take care of them, going to Fortress Lake they said.  U. gleaned various bits of news – Tom Wilson is laid up with a sprained ankle at Banff, John at the Plains.  The Indians at the Plains however, have all been put back on the reserve at Morley, the game wardens came out and almost scared them to pieces, arrested them for hunting out of season and ran them all in – etc. etc.  W. stayed up there to supper, and brought off a horse deal with them – sold them Fox, and just at dark two of them came down with W. and fetched Fox away.  So poor old Fox has to go back over that bad trail again.
               Aneroid at Graveyard Camp varying from 5050 to 4900.

September 14, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 14, 1908

Camp Parker
Monday Sept. 14.
               Aneroid when we left, 6600 ft.  4 hrs. 20 m. drive to Moss Camp.  Aneroid at the big hill 6400 ft at the top, 5400 at the bottom.  Weather still very unsettled, with occasional showers.  It looks as if there was forest fire smoke down in the Sask valley and toward the Bow Summit.  As soon as we got over the Wilcox Pass to Camp Parker and could see Mt. Wilson in the distance we felt as if we were very near home indeed.  This made the 6th. time we have been at Camp Parker.  There has been a new rock and mud slide come down off the cliffs east of the North Fork a little below the big hill, since we went up in June, making a rough bit – sharp stones and mud holes.  We down the river flats as the water was low enough to ford with ease, much to Muggins’ disgust, as it was cool enough for him not to care for so much swimming.  After the 4th. or 5th crossing he began to ask to be carried, and U. took him up sometimes, but he does not much like to be lifted up by the scruff of his neck either, so it is a choice of evils.  Once when we came to rather a wide stretch of water, Mug stood shivering on the bank considering the situation, then he ran across the gravel flats to the edge of the woods and sat down there squealing gently and looking very dejected as the procession of horses passed him and stodged into the river one after the other.  It was plain enough which way he was advising us to go.  There has been an outfit over the trail, coming down from Camp Parker with unshod horses since the high water.  And in the afternoon W. went down the creek to the river to try for fish, and found quite fresh tracks, hobnailed boots as well as horses, as if some outfit had come up the river, not knowing where the trail lay.
               Aneroid at Moss Camp 5300 ft.

[Person and dog crossing river on horseback], Mary Schaffer fonds,
Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V527 / PS1 - 154)

September 13, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 13, 1908

Sheep Camp II.
Sunday Sept. 13.
               5 hrs. drive over the pass and down to Camp Parker.  The best day we have had on the pass, but a cold wind blowing and showers near us although we only got a few drops of rain.  No snow lying there at all.  Aneroid at Sheep Camp this A. M. 6900 ft. – Wilcox pass 7800 ft.  Mr. Brown and H. went from their first muskeg camp after leaving us, to Sheep Camp II.  U. thinks they camped at Expectation next.  We did not go up to the camp but he said their horses had been feeding around there.  They don’t seem to have camped here.  Aneroid when we arrived at Camp Parker 6400 ft.  Showery.

[Packtrain on Wilcox Pass] Moore Family fonds,
Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V439 / PS - 16)

September 12, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 12, 1908

Camp XIV. Friday, Sept. 11. Off at 9 A. M. 5½ hrs. to Flats Camp. Had expected to camp at the big meadow just below the quicksands, but it only took a little over two hours to get there, so had to keep on the Flats, the next feed. Perfect weather, frost last night, bright sun all day and not a cloud in the sky. Very peculiar and brilliant northern lights, starting with a bright streak right across the sky to the south of the zenith, with short, thick rays from it converging toward the magnetic north. Then all kinds of rays waved over the sky for more than an hour, finishing up with a sort of film over everything so only the brightest stars were visible. Then at 8.30 the moon (full last night) came up, and this show was over.

Mount Athabasca, Moore Family Fonds,
Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V439 / PS -42)

September 11, 2011

Mollie Adams Diary of her Journey in the Canadian Rockies, September 11, 1908

Camp XIV.
Friday, Sept. 11.
               Off at 9 A. M.  5½ hrs. to Flats Camp.  Had expected to camp at the big meadow just below the quicksands, but it only took a little over two hours to get there, so had to keep on the Flats, the next feed.  Perfect weather, frost last night, bright sun all day and not a cloud in the sky.  Very peculiar and brilliant northern lights, starting with a bright streak right across the sky to the south of the zenith, with short, thick rays from it converging toward the magnetic north.  Then all kinds of rays waved over the sky for more than an hour, finishing up with a sort of film over everything so only the brightest stars were visible.  Then at 8.30 the moon (full last night) came up, and this show was over.